Agricultural entrepreneurs play an integral role in creating an economically and environmentally sustainable way to end global hunger. Learn how SGBs are taking action to do this. 

Colombia - The Disruptors

Video courtesy of Agora Partnerships

Key to achieving Sustainable Development Goal #2 (Zero Hunger) is making healthy food affordable and accessible to everyone. With her company, Agruppa, Agora Partnerships’ alumni Carolina Medina intends to do just that. Through use of a mobile app, Agruppa creates collective buying power among “mom and pop shop” owners, allowing small vendors to purchase fruits and vegetables at lower rates which, in turn, enables them to reduce prices for consumers. “Hunger in our country does not necessarily mean lack of access to food, but lack of access to affordable and nutritious food,” says Carolina. With 75% of food sold in Colombia through small vendors, Agruppa has huge potential to scale and make tangible progress towards achieving the Zero Hunger global goal.  

East AFrica - farm inputs on credit

Video courtesy of ICS

Agrics is a social enterprise that helps farmers gain access to credit to be able to get the inputs they need at the beginning of a growing season. See how this is helping create food security and increasing household incomes in Kenya and Tanzania.  Agrics was founded by ICS, a Dutch-based NGO that focuses on sustainable rural development in developing countries. At the core of the ICS approach is economic development, using the forces of the market economy to create sustainable solutions to social problems.

Kenya - Choosing tomatoes over tea 

Video courtesy of Land O'Lakes International Development

Victor Kipkorir took a gamble to leave a career in electronics engineering in Dubai to start a farm. He and his wife, Nicollete back to their native Kenya, and decided to start planting tomatoes in the midst of Kenya's tea country. Watch part of their story in the video here (courtesy of Land O'Lakes International Development and Land O’Lakes, Inc), and read the rest in the blog that goes with it. It's worth the read. 

Vietnam - letting crops speak for themselves 

Photo credit: mimosatek

Photo credit: mimosatek

What if your crops could talk to you, telling you how much water they needed? What if they relayed information through sensors and data in a way that took much of the guesswork out of farming? That’s what entrepreneur Tri Nguyen is doing through MimosaTEK, a small and growing business in Vietnam.  Keep reading >